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College Recruiting Seminar Attracts 200+
Extra recruiting packets available here

 

Table of Contents

 

I.         Recruiting Process Timeline

II.       NCAA Academic Requirements

III.      How to Excel in the Recruiting Process

IV.    Sample Cover Letter

V.      Athletic Resume

VI.    Follow up Letter

VII.   Questions to Ask College Coaches

 


The questions most athletes and parents want to know about playing soccer at the college level are: "when do I start", "what do I need to do” and “how do I get an athletic scholarship?”

1. It is never too early to start.

The biggest mistake a student athlete can make is to wait until the last minute. Your key to success in the college athletic recruiting process is rigorous preparation accomplished over a number of years. If you have left it until the last minute don’t just give up, submit your resume to as many college coaches as you can and if your good enough you should be recruited.

2. Freshman Year.

You should be playing for you a club team that allows you to play in front of college coaches by attending college showcases on a regular basis. This is the first year that teams start to participate in college showcases. Each year more and more showcases are entered into the team’s schedule.  

Get involved in student government, leadership camps, local community groups, student exchange programs etc. These activities are a big plus when it comes to the awarding of athletic grants in aid.

3. Sophomore Year.

Check out the NCAA Academic Requirements. Make sure you are on track. You might be the best soccer player on earth but if you don’t meet the NCAA Academic Requirements you don’t play. It’s that simple. Make sure you are on track in relation to "core requirements"[1].

Make a list of the colleges you would like to attend and send an introduction letter to the coaches at those colleges, Include updates of your sporting and academic achievements. At the end of your sophomore year send a further update to these coaches.


Without good test scores and grades, you might not make it into college, let alone qualify for athletic financial aid

Good grades are vitally important to athletes. College coaches love recruiting student-athletes with good grades. If their grades are high enough, then the coach can get an exempted academic scholarship or partial scholarship.

College coaches work hand in hand with the school’s financial aid office. The first thing a coach does is evaluate an athlete’s grades and circumstances to see if any other form of financial aid is available. The college financial aid office will decide what "needs based aid" the athlete can get and then try to boost this with a partial athletic scholarship.

There are a lot more academic funds available than athletic scholarships. Athletes have to work hard in school and achieve good grades.

What parents and athletes need to understand, and this is important, is that if a student qualifies for an exempted academic scholarship, then that money does not count against the total athletic department’s budget. This is why this is so attractive to the coach. To qualify, the athlete will need to meet one or more of the following criteria (this varies from school to school):

·         3.5 core GPA

·         25 ACT or better

·         1200 SAT or better

·         Rank in the top 10% in your class

Good grades are vital to an athlete’s chances of being recruited and playing college sport. Coaches need to be able to make up a "package" that the athlete will find attractive, as well as one that has the least impact on the college athletic budget.


National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA): the governing body for most college sports, registering with the NCAA Eligibility Center is your first step towards playing soccer at the college level

 

Athletes must meet certain academic requirements before they can become eligible to receive an athletic scholarship. As mentioned previously, good grades are vitally important to athletes.

The coach needs to know that you will perform well academically at college. If teams don’t meet certain strict guidelines each year then the NCAA will reduce the number of scholarships that the school can offer[2]. If your academic standing is high enough before you start college then the school can apply for you to receive an exempted academic scholarship as well as a partial athletic scholarship.

The NCAA, or National Collegiate Athletic Association, was established in 1906 and serves as the athletics governing body for more than 1,300 colleges, universities, conferences and organizations. The national office is in Indianapolis, but the member colleges and universities develop the rules and guidelines for athletics eligibility and athletics competition for each of the three NCAA divisions. The NCAA is committed to the student athlete and to governing competition in a fair, safe, inclusive and sportsmanlike manner. The NCAA membership includes: 335 active Division I members; 288 active Division II members; and 432 active Division III members.

One of the differences among the three divisions is that colleges and universities in Divisions I and II may offer athletics scholarships, while Division III colleges and universities may not.

 

The NCAA Eligibility Center will certify the academic and amateur credentials of all college-bound student-athletes who wish to compete in NCAA Division I or II athletics. To assist with this process, the Eligibility Center staff is eager to foster a cooperative environment of education and partnership

with high schools, high school coaches and college-bound student-athletes. Ultimately, the individual student-athlete is responsible for achieving and protecting his or her eligibility status.

Athletes who receive a scholarship from a Division I University on or after August 1, 2008, their initial eligibility will be evaluated under the 16 core course rule.

 (2004-2005 ninth grade)

Athletes will need 16 core courses as outlined below:

·         4 years of English

·         3 years of mathematics (Algebra I or higher)

·         2 years of natural/physical science (one must be a lab science)

·         1 year of additional science, math or English

·         2 years of social studies

·         4 years of additional core courses (they can be from any listed above or from non-doctrinal religion or philosophy or foreign language)

For athletes who receive a scholarship from a Division II university the old 14 core course rule will still apply:

·         3 years of English

·         2 years of mathematics (Algebra I or higher)

·         2 years of natural/physical science (one must be a lab science)

·         2 year of additional science, math or English

·         2 years of social studies

·         3 years of additional core courses (they can be from any listed above or from non-doctrinal religion or philosophy or foreign language)

 

NCAA rule change, athletes must now be place on the Institutional Request List (IRL):

Until recently, simply registering with the NCAA Eligibility Center and paying the online registration was sufficient to clear an athlete through the clearinghouse.  Under the new rule,  the athlete must contact at least one college coach and request that they be placed on the coach’s IRL.  Once one coach has placed the athlete on their IRL, the athlete will be cleared through the clearinghouse and the athlete will be eligible to play at any NCAA school in the country.  NCAA rule change[3]

 

Additional recommended reading:

NCAA rules compliance is extremely important. NCAA Athletic Compliance[4]

Credit Recovery Courses:

The student athlete is strongly encouraged to NOT use Credit Recovery Courses.  These online, computer based classes used to re-take a class are being highly scrutinized by the NCAA because it is difficult, if not impossible, to ensure the student athlete is the one actually doing the work.  Bottom line - STUDY and pass your classes the first time.

 

National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA): another governing body for college sports

The NAIA is the governing body for college sports and generally smaller, private colleges, e.g., Tennessee Wesleyan College.  NAIA has it’s own set of rules for college sports, recruiting and scholarships.  It also has it’s own clearinghouse which is not associated with the NCAA Eligibility Center.

Please visit the NAIA Eligibility Center[5] to get additional information and see a list of NAIA colleges offering soccer scholarships for men and women.


Recruiting Checklist for the Student Athlete

There are many online resources for the student athlete to track their efforts and progress in the recruiting process.  Here are some of those sites:

    www.escout4u.com

    www.ncsasports.org

    www.collegesportsscholarships.com

There is no need to spend large sums of money to be recruited or to be seen, organization and diligence is sufficient.

 

F

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Sr

When

Done?

Academics

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Fall

 

Begin ACT/SAT preparation

 

 

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Fall

 

Register with NCAA Eligibility Center and NAIA

 

 

 

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Spring

 

Begin “amateurism certification process” at the NCAA Eligibility Center.

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All

 

Take ACT and/or SAT.  Request scores to be sent to NCAA Eligibility Center. Mark “9999” in code box. 

Note: SAT uses ONLY the reading and math.  ACT uses the SUM of the english, math, reading and science as your score.

Tip! You can take the ACT/SAT over and over and the best score per section will be used. 

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Fall

 

Read current NCAA Guide for the College–Bound Student-Athlete.  Look for any rule changes.  Available at www.ncaa.org

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Fall

 

From NCAA guide, use the D1 core course worksheet.  Core course requirements must be fulfilled.

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Fall

 

Meet with high school counselor and review core course worksheet.

 

 

 

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Spring

 

Make sure your high school counselor sends your transcript to the NCAA at end of school year.

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All

 

Maintain a 3.0 GPA (minimum)

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All

 

If you are struggling with any subject get help from a tutor or teacher.  A must.

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All

 

Create a “Schools of Interest” list.  Research colleges so you can get a feel for what your desires are.  “Schools of Interest” list should contain 25-40 schools across all divisions (D1, D2, D3, NAIA, Junior colleges).  Begin to build a relationship with each coach.

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Review and update your “Schools of Interest” list.  Continue to research colleges so you can get a feel for what your desires are. 

 

 


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When

Done?

Athletics

 

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Fall

 

Ask a qualified third-party (club coach, coach) to review film or in person for honest feedback on your strengths and weaknesses.  Find out what you need to focus on.

 

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In season

 

Remind coaches of your future division scholarship goals.  Constantly seek their help to sharpen your skills to prepare for the next level.  Always give 110% and keep on the good side of coaches.

 

 

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In season

 

If you are a stand out player, notify your local press and invite them to games.

 

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All

 

Continue to evaluate your club participation and talk with your coaches about playing at major tournaments that have the highest level of competition.

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Maintain a year around strength and speed program

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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When

Done?

Your online information at (site of your choice)

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Ask coaches and others for references (clergy included). Get information (name, phone, email) and enter into your profile

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Keep information up to date after every athletic testing and “Schools of Interest” section.

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Email college coaches with the link to your web page

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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When

Done?

You the Student-Athlete

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All

 

Write your goals down in the following areas; academics, strength and conditioning, athletic skills, year end awards and summer camps.  Detail you plan and tape it to your mirror. 

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All

 

Stupid mistakes can cost you future scholarship offers.  Think not only about your grades, but social activities as well.

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All

 

Enlist the help of other especially your parents.  Be respectful to all.

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All

 

Never wait, time is only on your side if you prepare early. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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Sr

When

Done?

Recruiting

 

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All

 

Know the important recruiting dates for Soccer.  Especially calls allowed dates and rules.  These are available from the NCAA and NAIA web sites.

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All

 

Review your voicemail and social networking sites (Facebook, MySpace, etc.).  This is your character on public display. Keep it appropriate for prospective coaches.  They will research how you really are.

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After season

 

Keep your online recruiting profile current. 

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Start sending emails via services offered on the web sties

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All

 

Review and update your “Schools of Interest” list.  How interested are the coaches?

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Fall

 

Review recruiting guideline for all divisions.  Make sure you are and stay on track.

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Fall

 

Schedule prospective visits to your games or school.

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Pre season

 

Where are you high light videos going to come from.  See eScout4u guidelines for tips and tricks.

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After Season

 

Finish your highlight videos.  Send video links to coaches. Follow up; see if they watched them and what they thought.   « Under some circumstances coaches may want to see your videos.

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Spring

 

Start planning for unofficial visits.  This is a visit that you pay for and are not invited by the school.  You can do as many of these as you like, at any time.  During an unofficial visit, you may talk to a coach on campus, as long as it’s not during the black out period.

 

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Spring

 

Take 2-3 unofficial visits to schools of interest or those recruiting you.

 

 

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Spring

 

If a coach wants you to call then call.  If they text then text back.  If they give you their phone number they did it because they want you to contact them.  Keep them in your “Schools of Interest”.

 

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Always respond.  If you don’t, they believe you lost interest.

 

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Ask prospective coaches where you stand. Have a list of questions ready.

 

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Maintain relationship with coaches, notifying them of updates to your information and recruiting profile

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Keep “Schools of Interest”, stats, references and other information current  Be prepared for those looking.

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Spring

 

Think National not just local.  Market yourself nationally if you’re willing to go to school far from home.

 

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All

 

Good sportsmanship is a must, win or lose.  Look people in the eye when you shake hands.  Bad sportsmanship stands out; coaches may dismiss you before the see your talents. You never know when a coach may be watching.

 

 


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When

Done?

The summer before school starts

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Summer

 

Ask your coach and others which camps and combines they recommend?

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Summer

 

Attend events (camps and combines, spring games, etc.) if invited by a coach that is recruiting you.

 

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Summer

 

Schedule unofficial visits to meet coaches at the schools you are serious about.

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Summer

 

If needed, continue to take the ACT or SAT test or re-take to better your score.

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Summer

 

Call all coaches who have not responded to you.  Don’t be afraid to ask where you stand on being recruited.

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Summer

 

Line out finances with parents, accountants, or and entity that offers financial assistance.

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Summer

 

Continue strength and conditioning.  Coaches usually test the first 3 days after arrival.

 

 

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Summer

 

If you haven’t been contacted by any college coaches then contact Josh or Jon for additional help 

 

 

 

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Summer

 

If you don’t have a scholarship by signing day of your senior year.  Don’t give up yet.  Josh or Jon for additional help.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How to Excel in the Recruiting Process

 

             Do well in school

             Improve as a player

             Select schools that you are interested in.

             Communicate well with college coaches.  Recruit the coach and the school the same way you would like to be recruited.

 

Excel in school

      Academics are very important.

      Meet with school Counselor.

      The better they are the better chance you have of getting additional money

      Some state schools waive out of state fees for good academics. 

      Some will give automatic amounts of money for certain grades or test scores

 

Improve as a player

      Make every practice

      Be early and stay late (work on your own)

      Improve yourself physically (Strength Training)

      Make sure to factor in rest and recovery

      Watch games!!!!!

      Make the commitment to reach your potential

 

Selecting Schools (Freshman/Sophomore Year)

      Get organized.

      Research Schools

      Write about 30 schools

      Schools can not write specific letters back to you

      They can send general info

      A good time to write is before major tournaments.

      Good to get your name on their list

 

Get Organized & Stay Organized

      The best way to get organized and stay organized is to use a binder.  Categorize your schools.  Dream, Realistic, Fall Back

      Make copies of your letters and save them

      Use a spreadsheet to keep up with correspondence.  Dates you wrote schools, dates that you received emails, letters, calls, etc.

      Spend an hour or so a week keeping up with the information.

 

 

Selecting Schools

      Academics

      Soccer

      Socially

      Geographic

      Financial

      Size of school

      Public or Private

      NCAA Div. I, II, or III

      NAIA

      Your goal should be to find schools that match you.

 

Academics

      Choose schools that match the academics you are looking for

      Make sure they have degrees that you think you want to study

      Search on the internet to find schools that have the degrees you are interested in.

      Cross reference your search academically with schools that you are interested in for soccer

 

Soccer

      Pick schools that are realistic for you

      Scholarship or Non-Scholarship

      Play or sit the bench all 4 years.

      The majority of the schools on your list should be midrange Div. I schools, Div. II and Div. III schools

 

Financial

      Do not rule expensive schools out

      Schools can use soccer money, academic money and other financial aid money to make it work.

      Local scholarships, businesses etc

 

NCAA and NAIA

      Division I

      Division II

      Division III

      NAIA

In general the higher the division the stronger the program.  However, the strongest Div. II and III programs may be tougher to play at than mid range Div. I programs.

 

Div. I

      Have up to 14 scholarships

      On average they will have 3.5 a year to give to about 5 to 6 players

      Examples: UT, ETSU, Tennessee Tech, MTSU, Western Carolina, etc.

Not all Div. I programs are fully funded.  IVY League schools do not have scholarships

 

 

 

Div. II

      Have up to 10 scholarships

      Average 2.5 per year to get 5 to 6 players

      Examples:    Carson Newman, Tusculum, Lincoln Memorial, etc

Not all programs are fully funded. 

 

Div. III

      No Athletic scholarships

      Usually high academic standards

      Some have excellent financial aid

      Use your soccer to get you an education that your academics alone could not earn

      Examples:  Maryville, Rhodes, etc

 

NAIA

      Not as many rules as NCAA

      Different contact rules

      Sometimes more financial assistance

      Examples:  Berry College in Georgia

 

 

Communicate with College Coaches

      Freshman and Sophomore year:  write letters or email

      Junior year:  Write and phone

      Senior year:  phone

      Sell yourself.  Let them know what a good person you are.

      If they like you as a person they are more likely to recruit you

      NCAA colleges can not use facebook nor texting to communicate with players

 

 

How to write letters

      All letters should be personal

      ½ of the letter is the same in each letter.  It should be about you and your interest.

      ½ of the letter is different for each school.  It should tie in why you are interested in their school specifically.

      Attach a resume

      Sell yourself.  Be open and honest

 

Video

      Video is helpful but make sure they are highlight clips and not full games

   Be mindful that coaches will still want to see you play in person

   It’s not worth the money to hire a professional just do your best to edit film on your own

 

 

 

 

 

Telephone

      Prior to your Senior year you may call the coach.  The coach can not call you or even return your call

      Senior year they can call once a week

      Prior to your Senior year you should call coaches and let them know about upcoming schedules and tournaments that you will be playing in.

      Always be honest.

      Sell yourself and your personality

 

 

Return Communication Quickly

      Return questionnaires, letters, emails and calls quickly.

      They can get away with being slow and impersonal, you can not.

      Being slow can be interpreted as a lack of interest.

      Players should respond, not parents.

 

 

Freshman/Sophomore/Junior Year

      Write letters to at least 30 schools

      Coaches can write specific info to you

   Some coaches may ask you to call them

   You can call them, they can not call you

   Your goal is to gain info about the coach, program and school

 

 

Senior Year

      Writing and calling

      Narrow your list by selecting schools that you are very interested in and by schools that show the most interest in you.

      Coaches are allowed two face-to-face contacts with you off of campus during your senior year.  Some coaches will do In home visits, and some may choose to talk to you after a tournament is over.

      Coaches can call you directly

    Gain info about the program, school and coach

    May ask you to take an official visit

 

 

Parents Role

      Sit down with your daughter and listen to what their goals and interest are.

      Guide them in the direction of their strengths

      Help them organize

      Give them advice when they ask.

      Help but do not write their letters or emails

      Talk with college coaches when it is time to talk about money.  Do not try to negotiate.

      Parents that are too involved can scare coaches away.

      Work in the background with support and advice

      Try not to put too much stress on your daughter

 

 

Goals that parents should set

      Academic

      What are your financial limits

      Try to encourage your child to look at programs that are supportive off the field.

      Remember that the goal should be getting a degree

      Level of soccer should be low on your priority list

 

 

 

Visits

      Unofficial Visits

      Official Visits

 

 

Unofficial Visits

      Usually taken prior to your senior year

      The visit is one that you pay for

      School may invite you on one or you can ask to take one.  Junior weekends

      Excellent way to see the school on your terms

 

 

Official Visit

      Taken in your senior year

      School pays for all or part of the visit

      You are allowed to be on campus for 48hrs.

      You are allowed 5 official visits

      Must have taken the SAT and have filled out the Clearing House

      Must choose them wisely

      When schools want you to take an official visit it is a good idea to know where you stand.  Are you a scholarship athlete, etc.?  This is the time to ask.

 

 

Goals of Visits

      See School

      Watch team

      Meet players and Coach

      Observe the coach and team.  How do players respond to the coach and how the coach deals with the players?

      See Appendix A for list of questions when taking visits

 

 

Scholarships

      Scholarships come in ranges.  Players can expect to get from 5% to 100% offers.

      Academic Scholarships can be combined at some schools to improve the package.

      Financial aid money is also available

 

Walk-on

 

          Walk-on describes a player that was not offered an athletic scholarship, but has a chance to earn a roster spot and possibly an athletic scholarship for the following years of eligibility.

          A walk-on situation usually happens when a player wants to attend a certain school, but the school did not recruit them or did not know about them.

 

 

Programs

      Average size of team is between 20 and 30

      Scholarships can be split between all or some of the players. 

      Most programs have scholarship and non-scholarship athletes.

      Your bigger more nationally known conferences usually have stronger programs (ACC, Big 12, SEC, WAC, Conference USA)

 

 

 

What coaches look for

      Good people.  Coaches are more likely to lose their job if players do not graduate and if there are problems with their program.

      Good players. 

      They usually have certain needs each year

      You may be good enough to play there, but they may not have a need that year.

      Coaches do not waste time on players that do not show interest.  They do not have unlimited funds and time.  You must recruit the school.

 

 

Where do Coaches Recruit

      Big tournaments:  Texas Shootout, Las Vegas, Disney, PDA, Surf Cup, CASL …

      ECNL League Events

      Smaller club tournaments.  Thanksgiving events, Presidents Day Events

      ODP Events

      College Camps

 

Major Club Tournaments

      Texas Shootout, Surf Cup, Disney, PDA, Las Vegas

      Coaches come with a list of players that have written them. 

      They narrow the list based on who has shown the most interest and who plays for major clubs.

      Watch warm-ups

      Watch how parents and players react during games

      Watch for conduct in hotels

 

 

ODP

      Coaches use ODP events to recruit

      Most Region Coaches in the older age groups are college coaches.

      Many coaches attend to recruit

      They will go and watch National and Region team events.

      ODP is the only standard that College Coaches recognize.  High School honors are not accepted as a standard.

      Coaches recognize the problems with ODP.

      I would suggest looking at it like any camp you might do in the summer.

 

 

 

Camps

      College Camps

      Coaches use them to make money first and recruit second.  If the camp is at a school that you are interested in, it can be useful.  If it is a big camp with a number of college coaches, it can be of some help.

 

 

 

 

PSAT, SAT, and ACT

      Standardize test

      PSAT is a test usually taken in the Sophomore or Junior years.

      SAT should be taken in the Junior year and retaken in the senior year if necessary

      ACT should be taken in the Junior year and retaken in the senior year if necessary

      Some schools require the ACT some the SAT.

 

Initial- Eligibility Clearing House

      NCAA requirement

      www.ncaaclearinghouse.net

      Must fill it out before taking an official visit

      Should be done at the end of the Junior year and completed at the end of the senior year.

 

Resources

      http://scoreboard.soccerinfo.com This shows the schedules and scores for each day.  You can link to the university or college from this site.

      http://gocollegesoccer.com/ This is website outlining all things college soccer.  Scores, news, etc

             Links to schools by state, division, conference, etc

      The Sports Source

      NCAA website. www.ncaa.org

      Universities web sites

      US News and World Reports Ranking of Schools

 

 

 

Your Club Coach or Director of Coaching

      They are a resource for you

      They should meet individually in your Junior and Senior years as needed.

      They will be honest

      Their ability to help players in the future demands they be honest with you and coaches that are recruiting you

Time line for elite player

      Freshman and sophomore years write

      Sophomore/Junior year call coaches and takes unofficial visits. 

      Make decision at the in the beginning of your Junior year, or by Spring of Junior Year. (March)

      First Wednesday in February of your senior year sign National letter of Intent

 

Time line for most Players

      Freshman and sophomore years write letters

      Sophomore, Junior year write, call and take unofficial visits

      Senior year take official visits

      Commit to school between December of Junior Year and February of Senior year.

      Sign National letter of Intent first Wednesday in February of your senior year or when you commit if after February.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ethics

      Expect honesty from coaches and be honest

      When you commit to a school notify the other schools that where recruiting you and thank them for their interest.

      Make sure that when you commit you are sure.  Unless the coach changes before you sign or something major happens, this is your choice.  Recruiting stops for you.

      What previous Challenge Players have done has helped you and how you deal with this process will help future Challenge Players

 

 

High School

      College coaches will not recruit at high school games.  There are a couple of exceptions.

      High school soccer may or may not be a good environment for you to improve as a player

      College coaches do not look at High School honors

      They look at Club and ODP honors.

 

 

 

Non High School Team (During HS Season)

      Improves players

      More competitive environment than High School (typically)

      Allows some coaches to see you against their team (Division 2 and 3)

      Allows the player to get rest during High School season and strength and conditioning

      Who should play

   Players that are not challenged in high school

   Sophomore, Junior and Senior years most valuable

 

 

 

 

 

 

Social Networking Sites

  Facebook, Myspace

  Monitor your page, it gives coaches a view into your life and activities.   Coaches don’t want problems in their programs (drinking, excessive partying, etc)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cover Letter – Sample

Mary Ling

6010 Mountain Place

Humble, TX 77456

(281) 765-3134

iluvsoccer_321@yahoo.com

 

 

    Dear Coach Van Linder,

 

 

         I would like to introduce myself. My name is Mary Ling and I am going to be a junior (05) in high school. I’ve been looking around at colleges and I noticed that your school not only has a soccer program but also a major that suits my interest, which is Forensic Science.

     

         I will be playing in the Challenge Shootout on June 4-5. I would greatly appreciate it if you came and checked out one of my games. My team s name is IMG Academy and I have attached a resume of myself.

 

        If your schedule allows, I would greatly appreciate you taking the time to see me play. I will send you my games schedule as soon as they are posted.

 

 

     Thank you,

     Mary Ling #6

 

 

 

Resume -  Sample

Shannon Van Matre #7

1151 Boland Drive

St. Louis, MO 62337

(314) 504-4599

SS:645-21-3452   DOB 2/01/86

Email: Pat@shannonsteak.com                           IM: Sanny@yahoo.com

 

 

Academics:  St. Joseph Academy                                 Athletics:

Graduation: Class of 2005                                            Club Soccer: Busch SC

GPA: 3.30                                                                          Position: Sweeper/Forward #7

SAT/ACT: Act 23                        

                                                                             High School Soccer: St. Joseph

                                                                             Position: Forward #10

                                                                            

References                             

Coaches:  

Maureen McVey - St. Joseph High School                      Bill Hopfinger – Busch SC

(354)358-9035                                                         (315) 955-1234

Mcvey@yahoo.com                                                  Hop_soc@hotmail.com

 

 

 

Upcoming Tournaments: Houston Shootout – Score at the Shore - WAGS - 

Orange Classic

Follow up Letter –Sample

 

 

 

 

Hi Coach Van Linder,

 

 

              My name is Lindsey Kay. I have previously written to you regarding my interest in attending and playing soccer at Baylor University. I’m a member of the Challenge 89 soccer team and will be playing in the Texas Shootout in June. It would be great if you could watch one of my games. I have listed my schedule below, my number is #15 and I hope you can make it.

 

 

Challenge 89 vs. Slammers    87 – 6/4/04 9:15am MP4

Challenge 89 vs. SoCal Blues     – 6/5/04 9:15am MP4

Challenge 89 vs. Surf White U16 – 6/6/04 9:15am MP4

 

 

See you in Houston

 

Thanks

Lindsey

 

 

 

 

 

Questions you may want to ask college coaches:

 

1)       How long do you train each day?

2)       How often do you train each week?

3)       What does a typical training week entail?

4)       How many games do you normally play during a week?

5)       How much class do you normally miss due to games (home and away)

6)       How do you travel to your away games?

7)       Does the faculty work with student-athletes to make up missed work from games?

8)       What are the overnight arrangements when you travel to away games?

9)       What is the travel dress code for away games?

10)   What is the schedule like for a typical home game?

11)   What is your preseason like?

12)   What type of conditioning do you prefer or coach?

13)   What system of play does your team mainly use?

14)   Who are the key players on your team and what year are they?

15)   What attributes make them key players?

16)   What attributes are you looking for in players in this recruiting class?

17)   What are your expectations of an incoming freshman?

18)   How many graduating seniors will you have this season?

19)   What positions do those graduating players play?

20)   How many underclassmen do you think you will be losing this year?

21)   What are their reasons for leaving?

22)   What is your philosophy on dealing with players who you would like to leave or want to leave on their own?

23)   How many recruits have you had visit that play in those available positions?

24)   What characteristics are you looking for in players who will fill those positions?

25)   Where do you see me fitting in with your program?

26)   What tournaments do you recruit at?

27)   How many tournaments do you normally make per year?

28)   Do you come to high school games or tournaments for recruiting?

29)   Would you be interested in seeing a video tape or a DVD of my playing ability?

30)   What type of information would you like the video/DVD to contain? (Full game footage, highlights, drills, etc.)

31)   How many players have transferred from the program?

32)   What were their reasons for transferring?

33)   Does the program have strength and conditioning program?

34)   Does the program have strength and conditioning coach?

35)   Does the program consist mainly of free weights, plyometrics or other ideas?

36)   Does your program have mandatory study hall?

37)   If so, how many days/hours a week is the study hall program?

38)   What other types of educational assistance is available for student-athletes?

39)   What is your spring season like?

40)   Do you play mostly single games or tournament play during the spring?

41)   Does the program have a curfew during the season? Off-season?

42)   What time is curfew and what are the penalties for breaking the rule?

 

43)   Do you have a written set of rules for the team?  Can I see them?

44)   If not, what are the main rules that you enforce for the program?

45)   Why did you choose to coach at this college?

46)   How long have you been here?

47)   How much longer do you see yourself at this school?

48)   How many assistant coaches or goalkeeping coaches does your program have?

49)   How many scholarships does your program have?

50)   How does that compare to other schools in the conference?

51)   What is the typical scholarship amount for a player in the program?

52)   I know that the scholarship amount is a one year award, but, what is your policy on raising or lower of scholarships?

53)   If I am injured during the season is my scholarship in jeopardy?

54)   If I am injured during soccer what provisions does the school make for student-athletes?

55)   Do you have a full time trainer with your program?  At training?  At games?

56)   What other resources does the school or program have available for injured student-athletes?

57)   If my playing eligibility is up before I am able to graduate does the program or athletic department maintain my scholarship?

58)   Does the program have a set of defined goals?

59)   What are the goals and did you accomplish them this year?

60)   What are the long term goals for the program or the expectations the school has for the program?

61)   Are any of your players around that I could meet or talk to?

62)   According to your rules would it be possible for me to train or play with your players?

63)   Where is your field located?

64)   Do you have separate training and playing fields?

65)   Do you share your fields with any other sports?

66)   How does your facility compare with other facilities in the conference?

67)   What is your team GPA?

68)   What types of majors are your girls studying?

69)   Can I speak with any of them about a particular subject and how hard they find playing soccer and working to complete that major?

70)   Is there an area where freshman must room?

71)   Will I have a soccer player as a roommate or would I need to choose my own roommate?

72)   How accessible to the soccer and training facilities are the dorms/apartments/etc.

73)   How accessible to the class rooms and faculty offices are the dorms?

74)   Can I see a dorm or take a tour of the dorm facilities?

75)   Do you have any advice for student-athletes interested in your program?